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10 Foods Banned in the U.S.

Sometimes it's hard to swallow when politics enters your plate

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    Haggis

    The FDA has banned the Scottish national dish in the U.S. because it contains sheep's lungs, which comprises 10-15% of the dish, in addition to sheep's heart and liver, and cooked in the sheep’s stomach.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Horse Meat

    Horse meat is banned in the U.S. for human consumption, but there are factories that slaughter horses and ship the meat overseas, where consuming horse meat is popular in Europe, Asia and Latin America.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Kinder Eggs

    The German candy is popular throughout Europe, but has been banned in the U.S. because officials have deemed it to be a choking hazard, as the candy egg has a milk chocolate shell and a surprise toy inside. Violators can be charged $2,500 per egg. Shhh... nobody tell the government that there's a plastic baby Jesus somewhere in a Three Kings Day cake.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Foie Gras

    Foie gras, which is a fatty goose liver, is banned in California out of animal welfare concerns. The process of fattening the goose liver raises ethical questions because it involves force-feeding the animal more food than it would eat in the wild, which creates a buttery consistency that’s produced by fat deposits.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Pig's Blood Cake

    The USDA bans the consumption of pig's blood because it believes it's generally unsafe for humans. The Taiwanese snack on a stick is made with pig's blood, rice and soy broth.

    Photo: Allen Timothy Chang, aka Allentchang /Wikipedia

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    Fugu

    Fugu, a Japanese puffer fish, is lethally poisonous if not prepared properly. It's illegal to serve it in the U.S., but Japan requires chefs to obtain a license and bans cooking the fish at home. The fugu poison renders the victim unable to breathe, and death is caused by asphyxiation.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Shark Fin Soup

    Shark fin soup is banned in California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New York, Oregon, Washington. The popular Chinese dish is made by removing the fin off a shark, and then discarding the body into the ocean, where the shark is rendered unable to swim and dies. The rise in demand for delicacy, which symbolizes wealth, power and prestige, has led to a worldwide shark population decline. Shark fins in the U.S. can only comprise 5% of a fisherman's haul, which are then shipped to Asia.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Absinthe

    Absinthe was popularized in the late 19th and early 20th-century by Bohemian culture and famous writers and artists like Vincent van Gogh, Picasso and Oscar Wilde. By 1915, absinthe was banned in the U.S. because of it contains wormwood, which has psychoactive properties. Since 2007, variations of absinthe have been approved for sale in the U.S., but they cannot contain thujone, a hallucinogenic chemical compound found in wormwood.

    Photo: Getty Images

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    Flamin' Hot Cheetos

    Flamin' Hot Cheetos are banned in schools throughout Massachusetts, New York and New Mexico because administrators have complained about everything from nutritional concerns to the red residue left on school desks and books.

    Photo: YouTube

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    Sassafras Oil

    Sassafras oil was once the primary ingredient is root beer, but the FDA determined that it has cancer-causing properties. And it doesn't help that Sassafras oil and safrole can be used to manufacture MDMA (ecstasy).

    Photo: Wowbobwow12 /Wikipedia

 
 

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